Mobility Justice for Workers: PMJ Supports #StrikeUberLyft on May 8

As our team designed the #MobilityJusticeDeck last year, we talked about how mobility justice includes the workers who manufacture, operate, and maintain our transportation systems. When the transportation industry creates new kinds of goods and services, they also create new kinds of workers. These are folks who support families, need safe working conditions, and who eventually age out of the workforce. Unfortunately, their prosperity is often left out of the plans of the industry, which is why there is a rich history of unions supporting transit operators and auto manufacturing workers.

Today’s mobility industry may tell the public that they’re all about innovation, equity, and sustainability, but they’re keeping up the tradition of worker exploitation. That’s why it’s so important for advocates like PMJ to demand better treatment for workers. We don’t consider mobility workers and mobility users to be different groups; we have a common cause. We’re all experiencing the insecurity that those profiting from the gig economy have in mind for our families and our futures.

In March, we hosted a webinar through The Untokening’s Transformative Talks series that spotlighted worker organizing in bike share and rideshare industries. Here in Los Angeles, Rideshare Drivers United is growing fast and their driver-led movement has a strong vision for mobility justice. At midnight on May 8, they are calling for all drivers and passengers to turn their rideshare apps off until midnight on May 9.

Check out more details about the strike here and join us in supporting #StrikeUberLyft on Wednesday.

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Adonia Lugo
Announcing the All Hands On Deck Fundraiser!

This summer, we are launching our new Hood Planners Certification Program, and we are calling for All Hands On Deck to help us raise funds!

The Deck

With support from the California Bicycle Coalition, we created a deck of mobility justice playing cards (#mobilityjusticedeck), a popular education tool that shares important milestones for mobility (in)justice from the 1840s to the present. The deck was developed by a talented team of researchers, artists, graphic designers, and writers, including Chynna Monforte, Hector Benavides, Grace Lynne, and PMJ staff. With ongoing expansion packs, the deck will allow us to continue cataloguing the history of the mobility justice movement taking shape today.

The Hood Planners Certification Program

Too often, transportation agencies turn to planning consultants when trying to address equity concerns. PMJ is clear that community members are the real experts, their depth of knowledge and lived experiences should be valued and paid fairly, and they should be the ones consulted to share their vision for what lasting, community-oriented, and inclusive solutions look like. That’s why we are creating the Hood Planners Certification Program, a combination online and in-person course geared towards community-based activists.

The curriculum will be delivered through three modules over six weeks and will engage youth (Young-Stars) and elders (Super-Stars). Structuring the modules are PMJ’s 5 Ds of street safety - Decolonize, Decriminalize, Decongest, Dignify, Determination (learn more here). Each module will be led by a different peer leader as the cohort takes a look at the history of mobility (in)justice in communities of color and an overview of the current cultural and political landscape.

Our program is grounded in our values, which is why we pay community members a stipend to be certified and connected to employment opportunities in the transportation, planning, and advocacy sectors. In the spirit of equity, this course will also be available to professionals and government staff for a fee. This powerful design creates sustainability and a cohort that is intergenerational, multidisciplinary, and from varying economic backgrounds.  The first online course is set to be released in late summer and early fall 2019.

Help us meet our fundraising goal of $30,000 to develop the curriculum and offer stipends to 30 youth and elders to become certified Hood Planners by 2020!

Your contributions will go directly toward developing a radical educational curriculum that uplifts youth and elders to become advocates for their own communities, have their community expertise valued, and get certified in the process.

Hood Planners & Staying Alive

The Hood Planners Certification Program is being piloted through PMJ’s partnership with Ride On! Bike Shop & Co-Op in Leimert Park. With support from the 11th Hour Project’s Just Transit Challenge, we are co-creating Staying Alive Leimert, a two-year effort to identify and address various cultural, political, and economic factors keeping communities of color dependent on fossil fuels. The first cohort of Hood Planners will gather surveys from community members that we will use to define a local definition of mobility justice and authentic street safety.

Our work on Staying Alive Leimert will in turn shape a broader Staying Alive Street Safety Platform to be launched in early 2020. We know that our most vulnerable community members face higher rates of traffic fatalities, displacement, intercommunity violence and state-sanctioned violence, such as imprisonment, deportation and death. Yet conventional approaches to “street safety” in transportation and mobility, such as Vision Zero, focus only on reducing vehicular violence. After years of engaging with this model and learning from community safety, Indigenous sovereignty, and economic justice, we believe that a robust street safety platform must be designed by community members in order to address their most pressing concerns.  

The Mobility Justice Deck grew from a seed grant provided by the California Bicycle Coalition. Many thanks to Dave, Jared, and the rest of the CalBike team for your support!

NewsAdonia Lugo
We Are Hiring: Inspiring Growth Manager
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Do you know how to inspire community members about mobility justice through safety education? Are you an experienced bike/walk safety educator who is ready to strategize with our team? People for Mobility Justice is seeking a new staff member to take the lead on our Inspiring Growth educational work. If you don’t find the details you need below, reach out to us at jobs@mobilityjustice.org.

About People for Mobility Justice

As Black Indigenous People of Color (BIPOC) we seed critical consciousness about mobility justice in all communities. We strive for a world where people have the freedom and resources to move in public spaces with love and dignity. We put our theory of change into practice through activities in three areas: Thriving Communities, Inspiring Growth, and Building Power. These activities are designed both to value our community members as “the roses who grew from concrete” and to authentically support them in urging decision makers to effect meaningful, long-lasting changes.

About Mobility Justice Education

PMJ is a leader in bicycle safety education in Los Angeles for youth, adults, and families. Since its inception as City of Lights/Ciudad de Luces in 2008, our group has set the bar for teaching bike safety courses to the most vulnerable communities in the county, both in English and Spanish. We have served more than 2,000+ low-income cyclists through our bilingual bicycle safety and legal rights workshops and distribution of free bicycle lights, helmets, and safety gear at schools, community centers and transit hubs. In addition to rides held during educational workshops, PMJ also leads themed rides that combine safe riding demonstration with community history. Our rides start with a safety discussion to set the standard for how to ride safely in a group, determine signals for communicating road hazards, and best practices for riding a bicycle in traffic with or without bicycle infrastructure (lanes, sharrows, paths, etc.). In 2018, we began developing the Hood Planners curriculum, which we will use to bridge our community-based safety education approach with our advocacy efforts.

About the Inspiring Growth Manager Position

The Inspiring Growth Manager will coordinate approximately nine active transportation educational activities per month over the course of one year. The ideal candidate will be a master educator and manager who has both administrative experience and a diverse network throughout the entire county of Los Angeles. In our education curriculum design, PMJ ensures that our programs, particularly around bicycle safety, directly address the concerns of our communities. This staff position is responsible for delivering well-scripted courses in a timely manner. The manager will schedule instructors and supervise their work, possibly mentoring newer instructors to ensure that participants learn in a safe environment. Administrative duties include ensuring that each educational activity is properly documented. Because the manager will also be responsible for identifying partners to host the nine educational activities per month, it is key that they be able to draw on their own broad and solid relationships with various community-based organizations, businesses, faith-based organizations, and nonprofits throughout L.A. County.

Required Experience  

  • Must be a League of American Bicyclists-certified League Cycling Instructor (LCI)

  • Must have a valid driver's license

  • Must have at least 2 years of experience riding a bicycle in street traffic

  • Must be well-networked with various community leaders, community based organizations, and businesses around Los Angeles County

  • Must have experience managing a team

  • Must have experience teaching in a popular education context

  • Must be able to travel and produce classes throughout the entire county of Los Angeles

Desired Qualities of Lead

PMJ is a alive and growing. This means nothing is static in our organization and we expect our structure to be flexible. For people who are self-driven, organized, imaginative and creative this is a platform to dream big and implement your ideas. Our leadership model rests on accountability to the community, while also honoring funding deadlines and reporting. We strive to create viable work for our community members to stimulate economic well-being. We hope staff will bring the following qualities to the team:

  1. Self-Driven & Accountable - Our leadership model is based on trust and allowing people to grow as needed. There is no manager but the Programs and Policy Organizer‘s role is to support leads and staff in meeting grant deliverables, more importantly maximizing impact to community. Hence, the lead will need to manage their own accountability around programmatic and financial matters that serve vulnerable communities.

  2. Organized - The lead will set and maintain strict deadlines for the team that match schedule availability and timelines to meet our grant requirements. In addition, we expect them to be reasonably timely, in keeping time commitments punctual, but always with the understanding that family is first. The key here is early and transparent communication so that we avoid misunderstandings.  

  3. Creative - There is no blueprint for this work. The lead will need to tap their own and the team’s life experience to shine the light on Leimert Park and its people. This creative approach can be experimental, but always solution-oriented. When an obstacle, challenge, or conflict arises, we seek to solve the issues using methods rooted in our rich cultural traditions.

  4. Imaginative - Dream big, above and beyond this project. How do we keep this project ALIVE beyond the immediate funding scope? PMJ leadership has been designed through the people. Our programs, policies, and philosophies evolve with the people. We are open-hearted to changes that yield increased benefit to our communities.  

Compensation

This staff position is 20 hours per week at a rate of $30/hour. Benefits of this position include medical insurance only. All positions at PMJ have potential for growth if so imagined and desired, any staff working over 30 hours per week is eligible for full time benefits. We actively stimulate BIPOC wealth by ensuring that staff are justly compensated for all their hours worked to meet our deliverables.

Conversation

All PMJ roles are up for trading, revisal, shifting, and transforming, according to staff and community needs. Our work is a conversation between staff, board, volunteers/apprentices (Mobility Justice Team members), and our communities. The purpose of this conversational approach is to yield maximum benefit to our communities, which begins with our team’s full health and well-being.

How To Apply

We strongly encourage those with the following identities to apply: Black and local Indigenous people, people with intersecting identities - LGBTQIA+, women and non-binary people, people living with disabilities and others with lived experience being part of marginalized communities. All applicants need to submit a résumé (max 1 page) and cover letter (max 1 page). Any applications longer than the page limit may not be considered.   Following review of applications, we will contact selected applicants for interviews and references. Please submit your applications to jobs@mobilityjustice.org by 5 pm on Friday, February 8, 2019. Interviews will begin immediately, and the position will begin in mid February.

JobsAdonia Lugo
We Are Hiring: Thriving Communities Manager
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Are you passionate about uplifting mobility culture in Leimert Park? Do you know how to coordinate multigenerational teams? People for Mobility Justice is seeking a new staff member to join our team and take the lead on our Thriving Communities work. If you don’t find the details you need below, reach out to us at jobs@mobilityjustice.org.

About People for Mobility Justice

As Black Indigenous People of Color (BIPOC) we seed critical consciousness about mobility justice in all communities. We strive for a world where people have the freedom and resources to move in public spaces with love and dignity. We put our theory of change into practice through activities in three areas: Thriving Communities, Inspiring Growth, and Building Power. These activities are designed both to value our community members as “the roses who grew from concrete” and to authentically support them in urging decision makers to effect meaningful, long-lasting changes.  

About Staying Alive Leimert Park Project

Staying Alive Leimert Park will center Black lives and Black liberation in mobility justice economic development and community planning. This two-year project was co-created by Ride On! Bike Shop & Co-Op and PMJ, with funding from the Just Transit program of the 11th Hour Project. Staying Alive Leimert Park will develop three sets of activities: the Mobility Justice Lab, the Hood Planners Certification, and Life Saving Education. The Lab will engage community members in a critical policy analysis of various street safety measures and policies (i.e. Measure M, Vision Zero High Injury Network [HIN], First/Last Mile). The Hood Planners Certification will undertake popular education with teens and elders, co-creating activities that share mobility justice and PMJ’s 5Ds (Decolonize, Decriminalize, Decongest, Dignify, Determination) with the public. Life Saving Education likewise will be a series of events for the general public in Leimert Park (focus on the HIN streets in the area) using a mobile education station built on a recycled cargo bike. Staying Alive Leimert Park is designed to cultivate community knowledge about mobility justice and local policies that impact street safety and economic development in the area. We aim to highlight the intersections of traffic violence, state violence, and displacement in Leimert Park. At the culmination of this project, we will host a regional summit to showcase our participants and to strategize with regional collaborators.  

About the Thriving Communities Manager Position

The Thriving Communities Manager will predominantly spend their time leading the planning, implementation, and scheduling of “Staying Alive Leimert Park” activities. The ideal candidate will rely on their own relationships and roots in the target community, which in this case are the Black and long-term residents of Leimert Park. The manager will recruit and liaise with the Hood Planners, a cohort of of local youth and elders. The manager will contribute to PMJ’s production of the Hood Planners curriculum and schedule speakers for their summer institute. The Hood Planners will produce events and receive stipends as our staff weave them into advocacy campaigns. Additionally, both staff and the Hood Planners will engage other community residents through Life Saving Education activities in partnership with Ride On and local artivists. The ideal candidate will know how to design interventions that call attention to injustices while building from the incredible strategies that people from Leimert Park use to thrive despite those injustices.

Required Experience   

  • Must have a valid driver's license

  • Must have at least 2 years of experience riding a bicycle in street traffic

  • Must be well-networked with various community leaders, CBO’s, and businesses in Leimert Park

  • Must have experience managing a team

  • Must have at least 2 years of experience working with multigenerational groups

Desired Qualities of Lead

PMJ is a alive and growing. This means nothing is static in our organization and we expect our structure to be flexible. For people who are self-driven, organized, imaginative and creative this is a platform to dream big and implement your ideas. Our leadership model rests on accountability to the community, while also honoring funding deadlines and reporting. We strive to create viable work for our community members to stimulate economic well-being. We hope staff will bring the following qualities to the team:

  1. Self-Driven & Accountable - Our leadership model is based on trust and allowing people to grow as needed. There is no manager but the Programs and Policy Organizer‘s role is to support leads and staff in meeting grant deliverables, more importantly maximizing impact to community. Hence, the lead will need to manage their own accountability around programmatic and financial matters that serve vulnerable communities.

  2. Organized - The lead will set and maintain strict deadlines for the team that match schedule availability and timelines to meet our grant requirements. In addition, we expect them to be reasonably timely, in keeping time commitments punctual, but always with the understanding that family is first. The key here is early and transparent communication so that we avoid misunderstandings.  

  3. Creative - There is no blueprint for this work. The lead will need to tap their own and the team’s life experience to shine the light on Leimert Park and its people. This creative approach can be experimental, but always solution-oriented. When an obstacle, challenge, or conflict arises, we seek to solve the issues using methods rooted in our rich cultural traditions.

  4. Imaginative - Dream big, above and beyond this project. How do we keep this project ALIVE beyond the immediate funding scope? PMJ leadership has been designed through the people. Our programs, policies, and philosophies evolve with the people. We are open-hearted to changes that yield increased benefit to our communities.   

Compensation

This staff position is about 10-15 hours per week at a rate of $30/hour. There are currently no benefits with this position. All positions at PMJ have potential for growth if so imagined and desired, any staff working over 30 hours per week is eligible for full time benefits. We actively stimulate BIPOC wealth by ensuring that staff are justly compensated for all their hours worked to meet our deliverables.

Conversation

All PMJ roles are up for trading, revisal, shifting, and transforming, according to staff and community needs. Our work is a conversation between staff, board, volunteers/apprentices (Mobility Justice Team members), and our communities. The purpose of this conversational approach is to yield maximum benefit to our communities, which begins with our team’s full health and well-being.

How To Apply

We strongly encourage those with the following identities to apply: Black and local Indigenous people, people with intersecting identities- LGBTQIA+, women and non-binary people, people living with disabilities, immigrant activists, and others with lived experience being part of marginalized communities. All applicants need to submit a résumé (max 1 page) and cover letter (max 1 page). Any applications longer than the page limit may not be considered.   Following review of applications, we will contact selected applicants for interviews and references. Please submit your applications to: jobs@mobilityjustice.org by 5 pm on Friday, February 8, 2019. Interviews will begin immediately, and the position will begin in mid February.

JobsAdonia Lugo
Angelenxs in Detroit
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This past weekend, we (PMJ team members Adonia Lugo and Río Oxas) traveled to Detroit for the third annual convening of The Untokening network. Untokening Detroit showcased the communities thinking beyond market-driven revitalization for mobility solutions, and we came back with a lot of ideas.

Visiting Detroit as Angelenxs, we saw familiarly wide streets and encountered the usual long distances between destinations. Río in particular felt a sense of connection with their history, as they share here:

Río in a selfie at the Motown Museum

Río in a selfie at the Motown Museum

Río in Motown

Detroit was closer to home than I realized. On the most superficial level, it’s the Motor City, which is closely linked to my many years of advocacy for bikes, bussing and walking. On the most deepest and profound level, Motown actually contributed to my existence.

My mom was born and raised in El Salvador facing such hardship that of all her siblings, half of them died due to starvation - Rest in Power. Mi mamá Bernarda tells me that when she was young, she survived starvation by filling up her belly with happiness. Her favorite way to do this was to escape into music, tunes that she’d hear neighbors blasting, as her family didn’t own a radio.

As a kid, I remember my mom’s glee as she listened to the Temptations, The Supremes, Diana Ross, and more. After I visited the Motown Museum this weekend, I realized the depth and the power of Black people in Detroit. Their insatiable desire to thrive transcended countries, language, culture, and more. This was contagious to my mom and her community in El Salvador, and it helped her survive. Simply put, there was no mountain high enough, no river wide enough. Detroit connected me further with my mother and reinvigorated and inspired me with the amazing and incredible power that Black people have in such a racistly rancid area. They’re thriving amidst racism there; I felt it in the air, water, and earth.

So, Detroit was a good choice for this year’s Untokening convening! At the convening itself, we were impressed by the good collaboration happening in Detroit between disability justice and transit justice advocates. We’ll recap the panels more fully in another post, and we’ll also be following up with information from the session we co-facilitated, “Untokening New Mobility.”

Below are Río’s photos from the Heidelberg Project, a legendary Detroit landmark created by artist Tyree Guyton in response to blight in his neighborhood.

Adonia Lugo
VISION INCOMPLETE
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Since the introduction of Vision Zero here in the United States, many of us have had sharp feels of dissonance. It has been touted as a great success in places like Sweden and New York.  However, success is often defined by the narrators and those who benefit. We have been in dialogue with other Black Indigenous People of Color (BIPOC) communities across the country and we often share conflicted frustrations with the Vision Zero model. While it attempts to save the lives of pedestrians and cyclists, who are disproportionately low-income and BIPOC, Vision Zero is coming in as part of a wave of urban change efforts with “unintended” (1) consequences of BIPOC being heavily policed and displaced physically, culturally, and psychologically. This blog is intended as an invitation to collectively define safe and secure streets in our hoods. The points made below are meant to instigate and inspire critical dialogue.

Our Mobility Justice Team started this precise dialogue to identify the current gaps in Vision Zero that all cities and transportation agencies most certainly need to account for. We are responding to Vision Zero’s foundational elements of Education, Evaluation, Engineering, Enforcement. We will deconstruct each one of those in follow-up articles, but for now we want to introduce you to our 5 D’s, because in the alphabet, “D” comes before “E.”

DECOLONIZE: May our approach in any urban planning, design and decision-making be rooted in the ancestral land in which we work, live, and play to honor the indigenous people and the native flora and fauna.  Additionally, we are committed to halting the colonial practices that displace our people to ensure that long-term residents will be protected and have full rights to stay in their communities be it as tenants, homeowners, or business owners.
DECONGEST: May everyone have access to transportation and streets that support our full well-being and keep us alive.
DECRIMINALIZE: May Black, Brown and Undocumented people have the freedom to move in public spaces without state harassment, deportation or death. 
DIGNIFY: May the people who are houseless, have disabilities, are LGBTQIA+, work the streets (sex workers, street vendors, etc) have immense protection for their lives and the resources they need to support their well-being.
DETERMINATION: May our BIPOC communities have the right to self-determination, which we define as ensuring that our voice and leadership are valued monetarily, from expert advice to implemented reality on our streets.

This is our introductory article to Vision Incomplete. Please be on the lookout for our follow-up articles to continue to DECONSTRUCT Vision Zero. If you would like to be a part of this dialogue please email rio@mobilityjustice.org

Written By: Río Oxas - Program and Policy Organizer
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(1) Things that are “unintended” are rooted in historical and systemic forms of oppression, so this word takes no accountability

New Transpo TeamRío Oxas
Transformative Talks Goes LIVE Sep 5!
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This summer, PMJ and Pueblo team members have been co-creating a new monthly webinar series for The UntokeningTransformative Talks is a collaborative virtual space where community experts can come together to connect, share, and uplift. 
Learn more about Transformative Talks here

Río Oxas will host the first Transformative Talk on QTIBIPOC Bike Medicine at 1pm PST / 2pm MST / 3pm CST / 4pm EST TODAY, Wednesday, September 5th. Join a panel of organizers sharing the importance of co-creating healing spaces through biking for Queer Trans Intersex Black Indigenous People of Color (QTIBIPOC). More details here. No registration required, just follow this link.

In addition to the public webinars, we're also hosting monthly "Family T-Times," a closed space where BIPOC and other individuals from marginalized groups can find support for their mobility and transportation work. The first T-Time will be on Wed Sep 12 at 1pm. To learn more, email adonia@mobilityjustice.org.

Adonia Lugo
Introducing the New Transpo Team
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Many cities and transit agencies across the globe are talking about how to make transportation more green, equitable, safe, and “advanced” in this Digital Age. At first glance, these “new transportation” ideas seem wholesome and designed to benefit everyone, even our dear earth. Our People for Mobility Justice (PMJ) researchers decided to form a “New Transpo Team” in order to take a closer look at this topic. Here’s a reflection from our “New Transpo Team” which is our new think tank exploring the future of mobility.

New Transportation in the Context of Mobility Justice

As we summarize below, we used an equity lens to analyze the effects that some trendy models could have on the mobility justice needs of our most vulnerable community members. Could these new systems actually accommodate and improve the mobility for, let's say, an elder who is blind and undocumented? What other communities must be considered to ensure that everyone is served? Do these new systems uphold capitalist exchange and exploitation, or do they transform mobility into something more restorative? These are just some of many questions we raised.

Let's review some of the new transportation trends. It seems like every day there’s another system or issue popping up, so this is just a handful.

Privatization of Public Transit - It’s important to note whether a transportation system is operated by a public agency or by a private company, which can vary from city to city. Public and private entities are subject to different standards for transparency and public accountability. The California Brown Act mandates that government agencies, such as transportation departments, hold open meetings. How do we hold private entities accountable? Lacking resident oversight and input, decisions made in private business meetings could have adverse impacts on the travel experiences of our most vulnerable community members. Will these private companies pay their fair share for usage of the public roadway that is owned by the city and everyone who lives, shops and works in the city?

Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) - This term describes “ride sharing” companies such as Lyft and Uber. The number of people using TNCs is increasing everyday as they find this option more convenient than taking public transit in Los Angeles. However, we’ve learned from ADAPT Los Angeles that these app-based services are not necessarily in compliance with ADA requirements that would make it possible for everyone to use them, both in terms of ordering rides and having disabilities accommodated. We are also concerned that if TNCs decrease bus ridership, core bus riders could see cuts to their service, further narrowing their already limited transportation options. Added to all this, TNCs tend to rely on exploitative employment practices, such as classifying drivers as independent contractors, in order to remain profitable. They have not been providers of the good jobs our communities need  to thrive.

Automated Vehicles (AVs) - AVs are being touted as a safety innovation, but we are concerned that human-developed artificial intelligence technology is a poor fit for the often chaotic social life of shared streets. Besides traffic collisions, car-based travel also harms our communities through congestion and pollution, regardless of whether the driver is human or AI. We are also concerned about job loss. Are AV companies innovating new jobs for human drivers? If not, it is likely that they expect the burden of job loss to fall on public services while they profit from reduced operating costs. Another burden that this industry places on public coffers is developing regulation and installing infrastructure on streets and roadways to accommodate AVs. Who will pay for these changes, and who will benefit from them?

Electric Bus Fleets - Cities and transit agencies all over the U.S. are replacing their old bus fleets with eco-friendly buses. Where are the old buses going: to a landfill, or to a second life of service in another country? We know it is not always the most green option to buy something new; retrofitting systems so that they work more efficiently is a key strategy for those of us whose families have had to work their way out of poverty. We wonder about the contracting processes that lead to public dollars being spent on newly manufactured rolling stock, and whether they continue the destructive capitalist cycle of planned obsolescence.

Hyperloop - One of the most hyped new transpo systems in Los Angeles is the proposed hyperloop. This so-called innovation is essentially a faster subway in the shape of a pod that would move about 16 passengers at a time. This may sound cool and futuristic, but it’s a private venture by Elon Musk, who used federal bailout money to prop up his failing electric car company. He’s also been at the forefront of the AV industry that we discussed above. It’s hard to imagine that someone with a record of using public resources for private profit, and with such enthusiasm for eliminating jobs, would produce a transportation system with true public benefit. Why take on the huge expense and risks of tunneling for such a small-scale project in our geologically sensitive region?

California High Speed Rail - The California High Speed Train will have several clear advantages over planes, offering cleaner travel and better transportation options for people who are traveling from one city to another. In many cases, trains are cost-effective, time-efficient, and provide riders a fresh perspective on traveling and interaction with other riders. However, there are myriad issues plaguing the construction and effectiveness of the train: rising costs, postponed completion dates, and access for low-income communities. Then there is noise pollution, and potential displacement of long-term residents around stations as development increases. This is another case where public-private partnership will likely result in heavy burdens on public resources.

Red Flags

  • Private systems that rely on public dollars

  • Lack of transparency in system design

  • Success defined as profit

  • Economic benefits (such as jobs) go to people who are not local residents

  • Systems that remove jobs without replacing them

  • Individuals with disabilities left out of design

  • Systems that rely on cars congesting our shared streets

  • Private systems undercutting the availability of public options

There is a lot to consider with so many new transportation systems rolling out. What we’ve summarized here is a snapshot of the conversations we’re having at PMJ based on our past work on shared mobility and our commitment to mobility justice. Perhaps many of these systems shared above may have a place in the future of mobility justice if used appropriately; what feels urgent to us is developing good structures for accountability today.

We want to leave you with these questions that may help your community come up with some mobility justice principles in response to these systems. What are you thinking about? How is your community contending with this?

For more information feel free to contact Río Oxas: rio@mobilityjustice.org

Published: July 17, 2018 by People for Mobility Justice. Suggested citation: People for Mobility Justice. (2018). New transportation in the context of mobility justice. Retrieved from https://peopleformobilityjustice.org.

Don’t miss Metro BEST Bike Classes
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MCM, Bike SGVCICLE and LACBC have all partnered with Metro to provide free classes geared toward beginners who want to ride bike paths or city streets.

Schedule

  • 4/29 – Bike 3 Street Skills in Altadena
  • 5/6 – Bike 1 Back to the Basics in Long Beach
  • 5/12 – Bike 2 Rules of the Road in Gardena
  • 5/20 – Bike 2 Rules of the Road Long Beach
  • 5/26 –  Bike 3 Street Skills in Gardena
  • 6/10 – Bike 3 Street Skills in Long Beach